Daily diabetes management can be stressful and make those who have been diagnosed with it feel scared, frustrated and sad. These emotions can make anyone feel like they are losing control and like an outsider in their own life. Experiencing these feelings from time-to-time is normal, but can be a problem when the feelings won’t go away.

People diagnosed with diabetes have a greater risk of depression than people without diabetes. When someone in your life has diabetes, it is important to be aware of the risks and signs associated with depression.

Some of the common symptoms are:

• Change in sleep patterns like experiencing insomnia or sleeping too much
• Change in eating behaviors such as binge eating or the loss of appetite
• Lack of pleasure in activities that once were joyful
• Having guilt of “never doing anything right”
• Feeling lethargic and without energy
• Having suicidal thoughts or actions

As a family member, you are affected by a diabetes diagnosis too and learning how to cope with your loved one’s disease can be challenging. It is important that you remember that neither you nor your loved one are alone. The first step is to spot the symptoms of depression and the second step is seeking help. Remember, you are not alone!

Bandera Family Health Care Research is currently seeking for volunteers that would like to participate in a study for Type 2 Diabetes. Those that qualify will receive study-related medical care at no cost, a better understanding of their condition and compensation for time and travel. If someone you love has been diagnosed with diabetes, a research study may be an option. Click the button below to learn more.

For more general information, visit:

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/mental-health/depression.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/expert-answers/diabetes-and-depression/faq-20057904

https://www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes/depression